About Us

Gerald J. “Jerry” Vogt has been a film and video producer, director, 16mm film shooter, videographer, photographer and writer since the 1970’s, completing assignments throughout the USA, specializing in documentary, industrial, training, marketing and safety productions. Vogt’s work has been featured on many TV networks, including PBS, MTV, VH-1, ESPN, College Sports Network, Fox Sports, CBN, ESPN, PPTN and many other broadcast networks. His documentary on the Afghan Russia War was distributed worldwide. Through the Philadelphia based production company, Paolisso Communications, Vogt directed and edited the successful production for the Washington, D.C. based advertising agency, J. Walter Thompson, USA and their client, the U.S. Marines. For the Philadelphia based production company, ITS, Vogt directed a production that grossed the company five million dollars in three years of sales. Vogt has been privileged to produce video productions for some of the top USA Fortune 100 companies.

In the early 2000’s, Vogt began producing his own documentary programs that he distributed through his company Vogt Visual Productions. His programs were successfully sold in the United States, Canada, England and Australia. One of his programs was even distributed to Saudi Arabia.

Vogt loves a good story, a good true story, and he loves discovering and telling the stories of people, events and locations that will probably never make it into the big media. Vogt worked for many years producing videos that were shot at oil refineries, major manufacturing plants, power plants, specialty industrial repair shops, military academies, commercial construction sites, grass airfields, antique boat and aircraft restoration shops, and many other locations that featured the remarkable skills of the “little people.” After working at each location, it became apparent to Vogt that real drama takes place each day in places that seem unimportant and ordinary to the general public.

Passing by a manufacturing plant, oil refinery or construction site, the general public usually does not realize that great things are happening there. Once while filming at an industrial plant, Vogt met a man machining a part from a block of steel. The man was a tool and die maker, and working from blueprints placed close to his machine, Vogt learned the man had been working on the part, five days a week, 10 hours a day, for over ten months. The young man was part of a two man team, working second shift on the part each day, following the intricate directions laid out on the prints. The man was in his early thirties, and spoke enthusiastically about the details of his work, and the years of training he had received in order to perform his job.

It was apparent the work was slow and precise, but most of all complicated. The information on the print was jammed with angled lines, arrows, numbers, and circles. In many places on the drawing the information was overlapping to the point it was impossible for an untrained eye to separate the detail. However, the young tool and die maker, dressed in a blue work shirt and pants, moved between the drawing and his machine without hesitation, adjusting his machine to make intricate cuts into the steel block. Accuracy to the machine cuts were to the .0001 percentage point. In other words, the work was true precision. The man told Vogt, that he or his first shift partner could make a mistake at any moment. That would mean the work of the last ten months, by both men, would be lost, at a high cost to his employer, and the customer waiting for the part. Vogt believed it was only one example of the true drama that was happening at that industrial plant, unknown and unnoticed by the general public.

The skill and confidence demonstrated by the tool and die maker demonstrated to Vogt that many people are quietly living lives that deserve recognition and notice. If for no other reason other than to inspire and inform that great things are being done by “ordinary people” every day on this great planet we know as earth. It is with this realization the Web site: Broadcaststories.com was formed. This Web site intends to: “Celebrate the Ordinary.”

 

 

 

About the Author

Gerald J. “Jerry” Vogt has been a film and video producer, director, 16mm film shooter, videographer, photographer and writer since the 1970’s, completing assignments throughout the USA, specializing in documentary, industrial, training, marketing and safety productions. Vogt’s work has been featured on many TV networks, including PBS, MTV, VH-1, ESPN, College Sports Network, Fox Sports, CBN, ESPN, PPTN and many other broadcast networks.